Cydonia oblonga


Quinces are generally bought as grafted plants, either onto a 'Quince A' (semi dwarfing) or 'Quince C' (dwarfing) rootstock. They come in many shapes and sizes, from large spreading trees that make an attractive specimen to half standards that are suitable for smaller gardens or shrubs suitable for pots. Free standing trees attain a height and spread of 3.75 to 5m, depending on the rootstock, position, and soil type. Bears a bright golden yellow pear shaped fruit when mature. Throughout history the cooked fruit has been used as food, but the tree is also grown for its attractive blossoms.





  • Culture
  • Concerns
  • Management
Culture for Quince

A versatile tree that is tolerant of most soils (clay, loam, sand), but prefers a heavy slightly acidic soil (pH 5 to 6.5). Does not grow well in alkaline soils. Relatively drought tolerant. Performs poorly under prolonged waterlogged conditions. Prefers full sun, but it will tolerate partial shade.

Concerns about Quince

Susceptible to the fungal diseases quince leaf blight and brown rot; fungal diseases which attack the leaf and fruit respectively. Disease severity will be higher under wet conditions. Caterpillars of the codling moth can burrow into quince in summer, resulting in fruit that is ridden with tunnels and excrement.

Management Practices for Quince

Responds well to spring or autumn fertilization. If the pH is too high leaf chlorosis develops, so reduce the pH using iron sulphate. Treat foliage preventatively with fungicide sprays if leaf blight or brown rot is observed. Place pheromone traps in trees for Codling moth. Spray when moths are first caught. Requires little pruning. Benefits from mulching.

Photos related to Quince



Quince Fruit Growing on Tree

Flowering Quince Shrub

Symptoms of Quince Leaf Blight

Telephone

703-397-8410

Location

P.O. Box 2340
Leesburg , VA 20177

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